Jeff Patton

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Good Product Evangelist, author or “User Story Mapping”

jpattonassociates.com
 @jeffpatton

Jeff makes use of over 20 years of product design and development experience to help companies create great products.

Jeff started in software development in the early 90s as a project leader and senior developer for a small software product company. There he learned that well written code, and fast delivery isn’t the secret to success, it’s just table stakes. It’s actually deep understanding of your customers and users coupled with a desire to create a product that’s really valuable to them that makes the biggest difference.

In 2000 Jeff worked as a product manager at one of the first companies adopting Extreme Programming. It was there he built a strong appreciation for the discipline that Agile thinking brings to software development and a deep concern for what seemed to be left out, specifically good product thinking. Since then Jeff has been an evangelist championing the inclusion of strong product design and user experience practice in Agile development. Today Jeff teaches and coaches a contemporary blend of practice that incorporates Lean and Lean Startup and Design Thinking all directed at helping organizations build products their customers love.

Jeff’s a Certified Scrum Trainer, and winner of the Agile Alliance’s 2007 Gordon Pask Award for contributions to Agile Development. Jeff is author of the O’Reilly book User Story Mapping which describes a simple holistic approach to using stories in Agile development without losing site of the big picture. You can learn more about Jeff at his websites: jpattonassociates.com, and agileproductdesign.com. There you can find essays and past writing from his columns with StickyMinds.com, Better Software Magazine, and IEEE Software on Jeff’s websites: jpattonassociates.com and agileproductdesign.com.

YOW! 2013 Brisbane

Safety Not Guaranteed: How Successful Teams Ignore the Rules to Create Successful Products
AGILE PRACTICES

If you’re looking for simple solutions for building successful products, you won’t find them in this talk. This is the talk about how hard it really is to succeed, and how the best way to succeed is to ignore the best practice and avoid playing it safe.

In this talk, you’ll hear about companies that started with the best of intentions. But in the end, deliberately broke their process and learned a few counter-intuitive things along the way: The most user-centric companies learned to lie to their customers, skip research, trust their guesses, and stop worrying about usability. The most agile companies learned to deliberately ship bad code, and to stop planning more than a few hours in advance. Design Thinking advocates adopted Lean Startup thinking. And, Lean Startup advocates adopted Design Thinking. In the end the most successful companies end up with a process soup that’s not true to any single process style, and definitely not simple to explain to anyone. They learned that to really win the product development game, they’ve got to worry a lot less about safely delivering on time.

If you attend, you might end up with a few clever ideas to try in your organization. But what I hope you take away is a willingness to abandon the false security of any process approach, keep the best ideas and abandon the rest to focus on succeeding in spite of your process.

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